donnan.com

National Cemetery of the Alleghenies

National Cemetery of the Alleghenies entrance

  
1158 Morgan Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017
Phone: 724-746-4363


 

Directions, Maps and Weather
for
National Cemetery of the Alleghenies

Map to National Cemetery
of the Alleghenies

GPS Coordinate
N40 18,790' W080 09,251'
   
Printable Map to the
Cemetery (PDF)
  
Directions from Pittsburgh and points north
  • Exit off Interstate 79 at the Southpointe Interchange, Exit 48.

  • Turn left at the exit ramp stop sign onto Southpointe Blvd.

  • Travel mile on Southpointe Blvd to the stop sign at Morganza Road (formerly named Washington Pike).

  • Turn left on Morganza Road and travel 1 miles.

  • Turn left at the stop sign at Morgan Road and travel -mile to the first cemetery entrance on the right.

Printable Directions (PDF)
   

National veterans cemetery near Bridgeville PA
  
Directions from Washington and points south
  • Exit off Interstate 79 at the Southpointe Interchange, Exit 48.

  • Turn right at the exit ramp stop sign onto Southpointe Blvd.

  • Travel mile on Southpointe Blvd to the stop sign at Morganza Road (formerly named Washington Pike).

  • Turn left on Morganza Road and travel 1 miles.

  • Turn left at the stop sign at Morgan Road and travel -mile to the first cemetery entrance on the right.

Printable Directions (PDF)
  

  
Weather at the National Cemetery of the Alleghenies
Weather forecast            Radar Loop

  

Location Map - National Cemetery of the Alleghenies
MAP LEGEND

 A. Main Entrance / Exit
 B. Public Information Center
     - Visitor / Funeral Orientation
     - Public Restrooms
     - Grave Site Locator
     - Funeral Assembly Area (by orange asterisk)

C. Assembly Area
     - Public Gatherings
     - Memorial Walkway
D. Committal Shelters
E. Administration / Maintenance Complex
F. Flagpole Court
G. Columbaria
  

Columbaria

  
FUNERAL PROCESSIONS
When arriving at National Cemetery of the Alleghenies for a funeral, vehicles should assemble by lining-up on the right curb next to the Public Information Center (indicated by the orange asterisk on the map and the letter B).
Once the designated time for the funeral arrives, vehicles will travel in a procession to one of the three Committal Shelters (shown by the letter D on the map).

  
LOCATING A GRAVE

Gravesite Locator with touch screen and map printer Touchscreen shows Name, Service Period, Branch, Rank, and Section & Site Location in National Cemetery of the Alleghenies
Gravesite Locator kiosk
touch screen & map printer is located
in the Public Information Center
(shown with letter "B" on map above)
  
  
LOCATING A GRAVE ON THE GRAVESITE LOCATOR
Use the computer touch screen to enter the person's last name. If you only wish to enter the first few letters of the last name, a list of possible names will appear. Once you select the person's name, you will have the option of printing a locator map showing where the various sections of the cemetery are located, and what number is on the back of the headstone.
Next, go to the section of the cemetery where the grave is located. Look at the numbers on the back of the headstones to help you locate the grave. The stones are numbered in order, row by row, in each section.
If you need further assistance, check with a volunteer in the Public Information Center or an employee at the Administration Complex.

  

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Those who would like to volunteer at National Cemetery of the Alleghenies should contact Kathy Morton at 724-746-4363. Volunteers work flexible shifts in the Public Information Center weekdays from 9:00am-3:00pm, and weekends from 10:00am-2:00pm.

  

  

National Cemetery of the Alleghenies Dedication
Formal Dedication Ceremony
October 9, 2005
  

  
   Articles


HISTORY OF
NATIONAL CEMETERY OF THE ALLEGHENIES

This 292-acre national cemetery is located along Interstate 79 in northern Washington County, nicely situated on the rolling hills of two farms originally owned by the Morgan family. The cemetery is large enough to provide veteran burials through the middle of the 21st century. The first veteran burials took place in August 2005, and there were over 1300 interments during the first 29 months. National Cemetery of the Alleghenies provides in-ground sites and columbaria niches for cremated remains, as well as full-casket gravesites. Services take place during weekday hours, while visitation is daily, from sunrise to sunset.

National Cemetery of the Alleghenies

National Cemetery of the Alleghenies serves the greater Pittsburgh area and is the third of three national cemeteries now located in Pennsylvania. The first two national cemeteries that were established in Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia and Indiantown Gap -- are located in the eastern part of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia National Cemetery was established in 1862 and is now closed to new interments, unless space is available in the same gravesite of a previously interred family member. Indiantown Gap National Cemetery was established in 1976 to serve as the national cemetery for five states. The 677-acre cemetery is located 25 miles northeast of Harrisburg and has space available for casketed and cremated remains.
   

Rolling hills of the National Cemetery of the Alleghenies near Bridgeville, PA

One of the original committal service shelters overlooks the
rolling countryside of National Cemetery of the Alleghenies

  

Map to National Cemetery of the Alleghenies

Click map to enlarge

  
  

Christmas 2008
  
Day is done, gone the sun
  
  
Day is done, gone the sun
From the hills,
From the lake,
From the sky.
All is well, safely rest
God is nigh.
  
Fading light, dims the sight,
And a star,
Gems the sky,
Gleaming bright,
From afar, drawing nigh,
Falls the night.
  
Thanks and praise, for our days,
Neath the sun,
Neath the stars,
Neath the sky.
As we go, this we know,
God is nigh.
TAPS

  
  
Columbaria at National Cemetery of the Alleghenies

  
  

What is the origin of the 21-gun salute?

The use of gun salutes for military occasions is traced to early warriors who demonstrated their peaceful intentions by placing their weapons in a position that rendered them ineffective. Apparently this custom was universal, with the specific act varying with time and place, depending on the weapons being used. A North African tribe, for example, trailed the points of their spears on the ground to indicate that they did not mean to be hostile.
  
The tradition of rendering a salute by cannon originated in the 14th century as firearms and cannons came into use. Since these early devices contained only one projectile, discharging them once rendered them ineffective. Originally warships fired seven-gun salutes--the number seven probably selected because of its astrological and Biblical significance. Seven planets had been identified and the phases of the moon changed every seven days. The Bible states that God rested on the seventh day after Creation, that every seventh year was sabbatical and that the seven times seventh year ushered in the Jubilee year.
  
One of the Committal Shelters at National Cemetery of the AllegheniesLand batteries, having a greater supply of gunpowder, were able to fire three guns for every shot fired afloat, hence the salute by shore batteries was 21 guns. The multiple of three probably was chosen because of the mystical significance of the number three in many ancient civilizations. Early gunpowder, composed mainly of sodium nitrate, spoiled easily at sea, but could be kept cooler and drier in land magazines. When potassium nitrate improved the quality of gunpowder, ships at sea adopted the salute of 21 guns.
  
The 21-gun salute became the highest honor a nation rendered. Varying customs among the maritime powers led to confusion in saluting and return of salutes. Great Britain, the world's preeminent seapower in the 18th and 19th centuries, compelled weaker nations to salute first, and for a time monarchies received more guns than did republics. Eventually, by agreement, the international salute was established at 21 guns, although the United States did not agree on this procedure until August 1875.
  
The gun salute system of the United States has changed considerably over the years. In 1810, the "national salute" was defined by the War Department as equal to the number of states in the Union--at that time 17. This salute was fired by all U.S. military installations at 1:00 p.m. (later at noon) on Independence Day. The President also received a salute equal to the number of states whenever he visited a military installation.
  
Looking south over the cemetery from Committal Shelter 2In 1842, the Presidential salute was formally established at 21 guns. In 1890, regulations designated the "national salute" as 21 guns and redesignated the traditional Independence Day salute, the "Salute to the Union," equal to the number of states. Fifty guns are also fired on all military installations equipped to do so at the close of the day of the funeral of a President, ex-President, or President-elect. Today the national salute of 21 guns is fired in honor of a national flag, the sovereign or chief of state of a foreign nation, a member of a reigning royal family, and the President, ex-President and President-elect of the United States. It is also fired at noon of the day of the funeral of a President, ex-President, or President-elect.
  
Gun salutes are also rendered to other military and civilian leaders of this and other nations. The number of guns is based on their protocol rank. These salutes are always in odd numbers.
  
Source: Headquarters, Military District of Washington
FACT SHEET: GUN SALUTES, May 1969
  
  

Wreaths placed for Christmas 2008

This webpage is provided as a public service by donnan.com
in honor of our nation's veterans and their families.
  

LINKS

Bridgeville, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh Vietnam War Memorials Pittsburgh Korean War Memorial

Washington County Pennsylvania Vietnam Veterans' Memorial

  


home | site map | terms of use | contact
Copyright 1998-2014   DONNAN.COM   All rights reserved.